Fantasy baseball auction draft strategies

Fantasy baseball auction draft strategies

November 5, 2019 0 By Luis Garrison


ANDY BEHRENS: Hey guys, it’s Andy Behrens with Yahoo Sports, feeling social, as I always am, taking your social media questions. We are looking again at Twitter. Got a question here from Damian Dabrowski. And this is a great question. In auction drafts, do you have a guideline as to how much of your budget to spend on hitters versus pitchers? So I like these pure strategy questions. And the essence of what you want to achieve when you go into a fantasy auction isn’t so much, I want to have that 70/30 split in terms of spending. Sometimes people will swear by 70/30. Other folks like to go 65/35 in terms of percentages. What you really want to do is acquire as much value as possible at the auction table. It’s that simple. So if you’ve got a $260 auction budget going in, you want to acquire players that you think are valued at something like $270, $275, $280. You want to just get as much value as you can at the auction table, even if it makes your roster a little bit lopsided, even if you feel like you had a little too much pitching, not enough hitting. You’re going to have trade assets. You’ve got a whole season ahead of you to rectify that and to address any weaknesses. So really, the auction is entirely about acquiring value. Now, as a practical matter, usually I will emerge from a fantasy auction with something close to a 65/35 split in spending on hitters versus pitching. Now, the reason that we don’t go 50/50, the primary reason, I would say, is that so much of value comes into your league in terms of pitching. And it’s not just relievers. We know that every year, about a third of all closing jobs will flip at some point in the season. So you can always acquire saves. The same is also true of starting pitching. You think about the guys that were added from waivers last year, whether it’s Martinez, it’s McCullers. It’s Garrett Richards. There’s always talent that comes in the player pool in terms of pitching. There’s always somebody that you can pick up off the free agent wire. You can almost sketch out a roster on auction day that includes a couple of empty spots– a pitcher. Because you know you’re going to acquire talent throughout the season. Hitters are a bit more predictable. We tend to spend a little bit more money there. There’s more active roster spots among the hitters. So yeah, we do spend a little bit more there. But listen, the whole thing, auction-wise, is about acquiring as much value as you possibly can. And if you feel that you emerged from the auction with, let’s say, $280 worth of players and you only spent $260, then you’ve done well.