Pio Tries An $8,000 NYC Cognac But Must Prove He’s Not A Baby First! | Excess w/ Pio

Pio Tries An $8,000 NYC Cognac But Must Prove He’s Not A Baby First! | Excess w/ Pio

November 7, 2019 100 By Luis Garrison


Hi. How you doing? Good. How are you? Good. I’m Pio. Pio, good to meet you.
My name’s Corey. Can I see some ID? I think I don’t have ID.
I leaving it in the house. All right. If you want to run back
and grab it, we can get started. No. I want a drink right now. Sorry, brother. I’m going to have to stick to
New York State law on this one. No ID, no cocktail. I’m no baby. You’re not a baby?
No. You’re going to need some- Give me that drink. What you mean?
Give me the drink. Oh, you’re not slapping my bar. Hi, what’s up?
It’s your boy, Pio. We’re Excess BET. We’re at Bar SixtyFive
in the Rainbow Room. Hey there.
My name’s Corey Creason. I’m the bar manager here
at Bar SixtyFive at the Rainbow
Room. Today, we’re going to be making
the Above the Law cocktail, our riff on a classic Sazerac
using ultra premium cognacs and a vintage absinthe
that’s almost 100 years old. The whole idea is history
in a glass. We’re going to start here
just by getting our glass ready. We have our crystal
snifter here, and what we’re going to do
is flame a little bit of absinthe
to make sure that’s ready to go. Don’t worry. I got you. And then we’re going to start
to build our cocktail. So this again is Louis XIII,
king of cognacs, my favorite cognac and arguably
the best cognac on the market, and we have the Magnum here. So in order to retrieve that,
we’re going to use the spear, and what this does is measure
an exact half ounce with each plunger here. Why do you use the spear? Because this cognac is so rare,
it’s so expensive, we have to make sure that
we don’t waste a single drop. So each one of these spears
here dispels exactly half an ounce into the glass.
In this cocktail, there’s an ounce
and a half of the cognac, so we’re going to do
three plungers, and that’s going to be the base
for the cocktail here. The other main ingredient
that we’re going to use, again, is our absinthe here.
Now, this is a vintage absinthe. We got this at an auction
for more money than I make in a year. The reason being it’s almost
100 years old, which I think makes
this cocktail just that much more special because once this bottle
is gone, that’s all there is. Where does this come from? The absinthe is probably
somewhere from Europe, generally around France, which is the same place
that we get the cognac from. Cognac is made in the Cognac
region of France, and that’s the only place cognac
can come from. We want to sweeten up things
a little bit with just a tiny bit of simple syrup. The reason we’re using
the simple syrup instead of a traditional
sugar cube is because the simple syrup
will actually kind of integrate into the cocktail
a little bit more so you don’t end up with those
sugar granules in the glass. We’re going to keep going
and add our bitters here. Two dashes of Peychaud’s
for the classic recipe, and then just one dash
of Angostura, which is an aromatic bitters. Just helps bolden
the cocktail up and bring out a lot of
the beautiful aromatics. We’re going to add our ice
to our glass. And then we’ll give that
a quick stir just to make sure that our dilution
is at the right point, and that the cocktail
is nice and cold. We’ll strain that out, make sure none of the ice
gets into the glass. A little bit of lemon oil
just on top, and then that is ready
to go, sir. Exactly. It smell good. Nice.
How much is it for this drink? We actually do this cocktail
off our menu for $365, and the reason being is
because we’re using some of the most expensive
ingredients that we have. Want a drink? I’d like to stay sober
behind the bar. Maybe after the shift. No, okay. And then I want
to go drink together. And then we’ll go? All right. Catch up in Washington Heights,
that’s my neighborhood. How much you got to drink
before I get drunk? Well, a gentleman never gets
drunk in a bar, but I’d say you’re
probably good, maybe about four
or five of these before it’s time to head home. I feel good now. Good. That’s the whole point.
Apparently, it’s only one. I’ll call you right back. Oh, everything beautiful. I’ll call you later my man