The Worst Luxury Car (Mercedes Benz)

The Worst Luxury Car (Mercedes Benz)

November 13, 2019 100 By Luis Garrison


One, two, three, four! Rev up your engines! [ENGINE REVVING] It’s time for the
Scottykilmerchannel. Today I’m going to show
you why Mercedes-Benz often turn into money pit
machines if you drive them for any serious length of time. Now take this
beautiful-looking Mercedes. It runs good, rides
good, but when I hook up this fancy
scan tool I have, look at all the red
trouble codes that it has. It’s got red trouble
codes all over the place. OK I counted them all. There are 25 trouble
codes– that’s your problems–
this car now has. So yes, this
beautiful-looking and– I must admit– beautiful-riding
vehicle has a ready 25 separate problems that
exist in the car because of all the crazy computer
controls that they put them. Now everything on this
Mercedes is practically run by a computer module. As you can see here, there is
suspension control module that operates the rear suspension. There’s a computer
just for that! And if you’re curious, just
that module costs $595. They also have computer modules
that operate the lighting system, that operate
the stereo system, that operate the transmission,
and they’re all equally as expensive. And take a look at the one shock
absorber for the front right. If you go over here,
it cost $1,190. That’s the price of
one shock absorber. And if you look at the
labor for putting that shock absorber in one side,
runs 2.3 hours labor. And when I called a local
Mercedes dealer here in Houston, they charge
$160 an hour labor. So there’s a lot of money
changing these parts out. And OK, if all this
complexity lasted a long time, didn’t break,
that’d be one thing. But, hey, as we’ve already found
on my little computer here, this baby’s got 25
problems already! But from just bad
designs– as you can see, the front
rotor here, there’s a giant ridge on the edge. And here’s why it occurred. For some strange
reason, Mercedes-Benz keep making brake pads that
don’t cover the entire rotor. Now if this was a
Toyota or a Ford, or whatever, then it
compares the right size so they fit over the whole
rotor and wear it evenly. But not Mercedes. They deliberately
make the pads so they don’t cover the whole rotor. So the rotors wear on the
inside and leave a tiny ridge the whole way around. So when it’s time to
change the brake pads, you have to change the
brake rotors with it, or the new pads will hit this
ridge and squeak like mad. And of course, like
Toyota, Ford, Chevy, you want a brake pad that
covers the whole rotor. The more surface area
the brake pad touches, the more heat
dissipates you’ll have and the better your
brakes will work. This bad design– it always
creates a ridge on the outside, and on the inside here too–
just requires new rotors every time you do a brake
job if you don’t want noise, so they can make a higher
profit doing the job! I just can’t wait to see what
the Mercedes lovers are going to come back with when I upload
this video on YouTube– how they can possibly defend
this horrible design. Scratching her head at that one! Heck, even the lug nuts
are designed to retire. Look at this! They’re recessed
way inside here. So if something ever
goes wrong, it’s almost impossible to work on
them without ruining the wheel. The lug nuts are so far recessed
in, if anything ever goes wrong and they get
stripped, you’re going to spend a small fortune fixing
something as dumb as a lug nut. Heck, and don’t even get me
talking about these stupid low profile tires. They’re great for a racetrack. They corner great, and
all that, but driving them in the city, look what happens. Not only does the
rim get eaten up, but the tires get chewed up
all the time because they don’t have much side wall. They’ll hit curbs. Bumps on the road will make
them smash holes in them. Planned obsolescence has gone
berserk with these Germans! Perhaps one of my favorite
craziness is this– watch. You open the door, the window
automatically opens itself a little crack here. And then when you close
it, it automatically closes itself the
rest of the way. The system breaks,
as break they all do, then you spend a small
fortune to fix it so the window can go down and
then go up the whole way when you close it, not go down
and stay there and get wet when it’s raining outside. Now they claim that’s to save
this rubber weatherstripping here from getting torn
when you open and close the door with the window up. But really, my 20-year-old Celica doesn’t have that and the rubber is still
perfectly fine and not torn. And there’s no leaks
inside when I’m driving. Yes, the Germans are masters of
over-engineering, if anyone is. And of course, the
market understands the problematical
natures of these cars. Just look at the
difference in value. We sold for $80,195. But today, eight years later,
you can get one for $16,972. So in eight years, this car has
lost $63,223 worth of value. And I don’t know
about you, but that’s a heck of a beating to take
driving a car for eight years. But if you enjoy riding around
in fast, smooth money pits, go right ahead and buy one. Or be like my customer. Buy the $16,000 one. The only thing you can
lose is $16,000 then. And just pray that it doesn’t
have any serious engine or transmission
problems while you do drive it before you sell
it on to the next person. And do realize, if
push comes to shove, they do make really
good-looking lawn ornaments. And remember, if your
car has any problems, just visit the
Scottykilmerchannel before it’s too late.