Upwork Bidding Principles to Win Contracts

Upwork Bidding Principles to Win Contracts

November 10, 2019 11 By Luis Garrison


In this video I want to show you some of
the principles of bidding that have worked for me in this competitive, really
competitive, marketplace to put together a pretty good side income or part-time
income as a freelance editor and proofreader. The first principle is you
need to get into a habit of bidding. I know when you get busy on other things
it’s hard to sit down and actually get around to bidding on things and you need to bid on everything. Pick a time or multiple times during the
day when all you do for 20 minutes or half an hour is look through the
listings. Of course bidding on anything costs you two connects per proposal. There are some free proposals — that’s if you get an invitation to interview. If you
get an invitation and it looks like a good job definitely bid because they’re
already high on you. They’re already interested in you. If you find that
you’re running out of connects, and you probably will if you have a free account, go ahead and buy a few more, do a few
more bids, or be a little bit more selective in what you’re doing but you
should be maxing out those connects every month. I consider the cost of
connects simply the cost of doing business so you will easily pay for
those extra connects or if you have an account you pay for twenty dollars a
month, you’ll pay for that if you’re getting any number of jobs. Another important point is to keep on
the lookout for time-sensitive jobs. So many clients want jobs done fast, and
you’ll only see these if you’re looking every day or multiple times per day at those listings. These jobs can be
really good paying jobs. They can also be dangerous because you have to maybe
rush things a bit. Just be careful and see how long the job actually is. Is it 400
pages in 24 hours? No way, don’t do that. You’ll only get a bad
rating, they might not even pay you, but if somebody wants a really short
admission essay edited, go ahead do it. You can do that fast. You can do that in
24, 48 hours, and the money can be lucrative because clients know that
you’re rushed. They’ll pay for that rush. The next reality of bidding is
simply that you’re gonna fail a lot and just expect that you’re gonna fail. Don’t
covet a job before you win it. Don’t think, ‘wow there’s a ten-thousand-dollar
job, I bid on it, I want to get it.’ Don’t think about that. Just let it go, forget about it because
chances are you gonna fail. I think my bidding success rate is about ten
percent but I bid on a lot of jobs so I might bid on 30, 40 jobs in a month and
get three to four of those jobs. That’s pretty good. So do a lot of bidding, do a
lot of bidding, you’ll win a few of those. If it’s a thousand-dollar job — that
one job you win that whole month — that’s really good. And if you bid on a bunch of smaller
jobs, so $50 jobs, $80 jobs, $100 jobs, who knows maybe you
win five or six or seven of them and you have a nice 500 to 700 dollar income and
it doesn’t take you that long to edit that kind of work. My philosophy is to bid on everything
and bid and forget, just forget about it, move on, just constantly bid on things and sometimes you’ll be surprised. A month later a client comes to you and says ‘I
finally made my decision, I want to choose you,’ and it’s a nice surprise. Another principle of this marketplace is
that pricing matters. Now that sounds obvious, but it can be used as a strategy,
and simply what I’m saying is despite me having a very high rating on the site, I have a 97% quality rating, I still lose out to people who underbid
me. So they put in a lower bid price. I’ve seen people with almost no experience on the site beat me by under bidding me on the contract. I’ve had clients tell me they really
like my profile, they like my ratings, my reviews, but I cost too much. So lowering your price will always get
you some number of clients. You just have to decide how low you’re willing to go. A
final point on bidding principles that I want to mention is really look out for badly written ads. So if the ad has a lot of
mistakes in it, there’s a good chance the document itself is badly written and may
not be worth your time.